Community Engagement

Service in Learning, Learning in Service


 

Community Engagement

Service in Learning, Learning in Service


Formative, transformative and service-oriented in an interpersonal, interreligious, multicultural world

Our Community Engagement programs provide a way to live out the conviction that spiritual care is ultimately a theology of service. Out of involvement with persons in need, and feedback from peers and instructors, students develop new awareness of themselves and of the needs of those they serve. From theological reflection on specific human situations, students gain a new understanding of caring and compassionate leadership. Participating students will choose a care context that that stresses leadership and service, which may be on or off campus, public or hidden. This service-learning will directly engage care-giving with the disadvantaged and address structural issues which underlie systems.

Service Opportunities

The Service Project provides a way to live out the conviction that spiritual care is ultimately a theology of service. Out of involvement with persons in need, and feedback from peers and instructor, students develop new awareness of themselves as persons and of the needs of those they serve. From theological reflection on specific human situations, students gain a new understanding of caring and compassionate leadership. Participating students will choose a care context that may be on or off campus, public or hidden, and that stresses leadership and service. This service-learning will directly engage care-giving with the disadvantaged and address structural issues which underlie systems.

Contact Usfor more info
 

Service Opportunities


The Service Project provides a way to live out the conviction that spiritual care is ultimately a theology of service. Out of involvement with persons in need, and feedback from peers and instructor, students develop new awareness of themselves as persons and of the needs of those they serve. From theological reflection on specific human situations, students gain a new understanding of caring and compassionate leadership. Participating students will choose a care context that may be on or off campus, public or hidden, and that stresses leadership and service. This service-learning will directly engage care-giving with the disadvantaged and address structural issues which underlie systems.

Contact Usfor more info

Professional Process Groups

Healthcare workers in all departments witness and are affected by intense and traumatic situations on a daily basis. Very often, these professionals do not have outlets or venues to process their own feelings and responses to the day-to-day stresses of their work. These process groups are confidential spaces in which nurses, physicians, social workers, and spiritual care providers can reflect on the ways in which their lives are being affected by their vocations and deepen their understanding of how their vocations are being informed by their lives.

  • Chaplain Peer Process Group
  • Social Worker Process Group
  • Health Care Manager Process Group
  • Nurse Process Group
  • Doctor Process Group

Contact Usfor more info
 

Professional Process Groups

Healthcare workers in all departments witness and are affected by intense and traumatic situations on a daily basis. Very often, these professionals do not have outlets or venues to process their own feelings and responses to the day-to-day stresses of their work. These process groups are confidential spaces in which nurses, physicians, social workers, and spiritual care providers can reflect on the ways in which their lives are being affected by their vocations and deepen their understanding of how their vocations are being informed by their lives.

  • Chaplain Peer Process Group
  • Social Worker Process Group
  • Health Care Manager Process Group
  • Nurse Process Group
  • Doctor Process Group

Contact Usfor more info

Workshops for Congregations and Organizations


For congregations and organizations/agencies looking to deepen their practice of caring for each other and the communities in which they are situated, The Shaw Chaplaincy Institute offers a number of one-day workshops designed to challenge and inform.

Ideal for congregational Care Teams, Deacons, Elders, and other ministries that visit community members who are in the hospital, extended care facilities, and rehabilitation centers, this workshop teaches participants how to make an effective hospital visit. (Link to PDF of brochure, with copies available upon request)

How to Make a Hospital Visit

Becoming a Trauma-Informed Congregation / Organization


Understanding the impacts of trauma on individuals and communities is essential in providing excellent spiritual care. This workshop teaches congregations how to recognize and understand trauma as it manifests in individuals, groups, and systems.
Based on the work of Rev. Craig Rennebohm and the Mental Health Chaplaincy, this workshop teaches congregations how to effectively provide spiritual care and compassion for people with mental health problems, addiction and substance use issues, and people who are homeless.

Companionship for Congregations / Organizations


Understanding Addiction in the Congregation / Organization

How has the community of faith or organization been responding to the needs of people with or at risk for substance use disorders creatively, thoughtfully, and with an eye toward outcomes that witness lives lived with wholeness, well-being, right-relationship and a sense of purpose? How are you working to ensure that people with or at risk for substance use disorders have an opportunity for lives that are rich and rewarding, that include work, homes, and meaningful relationships with family, friends, and God. We believe that the faith community and healthy organizational life is an integral part of healing, sobriety, and resiliency for facilitating recovery from substance use disorders. This workshop supports congregations/organizations as they support persons with or at risk for substance abuse.
Domestic violence, or violence in the family unit or work unit, against women and children, sibling against sibling, elder abuse, abuse of power, is a major public health problem, work liability and cause of spiritual trauma. We pose questions such as “Why do abusers commit acts of violence?” “How can we support you in your safety and happiness.” “How can we make the work environment harassment free?” The workshop helps congregations and organizations recognize 1) what is domestic violence; 2) warning signs of an unhealthy relationship; 3) effects of domestic violence and harassment; 4) moral injury and spiritual injury; 5) economic effects of domestic violence and abusive professional relationships; and 6) what congregations and organizations can do to help.

Understanding Domestic Violence in the Congregation / Workplace


Understanding Mental Health Challenges in the Congregation / Organization

One of the principles we refer to in understanding people with mental health challenges is that the mentally ill are just like us, only more so. The workshop helps congregations/organizations learn how to:

  1. mobilize faith factors and perceptions, or work place culture and perceptions, that assist and hinder persons with mental health challenges in communal life;
  2. help congregations or organizations understand how to work mental health resources into faith life resources and work place resources;
  3. interpret religious thoughts, cultural norms and practices to staff and the larger community in light of the presence of persons who struggle with mental health challenges; and
  4. consciously include mental illness as an aspect of community life and persons with mental illness as active members in communities of faith and organizations.

How to Make a Hospital Visit


Ideal for congregational Care Teams, Deacons, Elders, and other ministries that visit community members who are in the hospital, extended care facilities, and rehabilitation centers, this workshop teaches participants how to make an effective hospital visit. (Link to PDF of brochure, with copies available upon request)

Becoming a Trauma-Informed Congregation / Organization


Understanding the impacts of trauma on individuals and communities is essential in providing excellent spiritual care. This workshop teaches congregations how to recognize and understand trauma as it manifests in individuals, groups, and systems.

Companionship for Congregations / Organizations


Based on the work of Rev. Craig Rennebohm and the Mental Health Chaplaincy, this workshop teaches congregations how to effectively provide spiritual care and compassion for people with mental health problems, addiction and substance use issues, and people who are homeless.

Understanding Addiction in the Congregation / Organization


How has the community of faith or organization been responding to the needs of people with or at risk for substance use disorders creatively, thoughtfully, and with an eye toward outcomes that witness lives lived with wholeness, well-being, right-relationship and a sense of purpose? How are you working to ensure that people with or at risk for substance use disorders have an opportunity for lives that are rich and rewarding, that include work, homes, and meaningful relationships with family, friends, and God. We believe that the faith community and healthy organizational life is an integral part of healing, sobriety, and resiliency for facilitating recovery from substance use disorders. This workshop supports congregations/organizations as they support persons with or at risk for substance abuse.

Understanding Domestic Violence in the Congregation / Workplace


Domestic violence, or violence in the family unit or work unit, against women and children, sibling against sibling, elder abuse, abuse of power, is a major public health problem, work liability and cause of spiritual trauma. We pose questions such as “Why do abusers commit acts of violence?” “How can we support you in your safety and happiness.” “How can we make the work environment harassment free?” The workshop helps congregations and organizations recognize 1) what is domestic violence; 2) warning signs of an unhealthy relationship; 3) effects of domestic violence and harassment; 4) moral injury and spiritual injury; 5) economic effects of domestic violence and abusive professional relationships; and 6) what congregations and organizations can do to help.

Understanding Mental Health Challenges in the Congregation / Organization


One of the principles we refer to in understanding people with mental health challenges is that the mentally ill are just like us, only more so. The workshop helps congregations/organizations learn how to:

  1. mobilize faith factors and perceptions, or work place culture and perceptions, that assist and hinder persons with mental health challenges in communal life;
  2. help congregations or organizations understand how to work mental health resources into faith life resources and work place resources;
  3. interpret religious thoughts, cultural norms and practices to staff and the larger community in light of the presence of persons who struggle with mental health challenges; and
  4. consciously include mental illness as an aspect of community life and persons with mental illness as active members in communities of faith and organizations.

Let's have a conversation


In this world poised for healing, do you feel called to bring compassionate presence to others? Get in touch with your questions, and I’ll be very happy to help you explore ways in which the Shaw Chaplaincy Institute is able to help you bring your whole self into service.

- Rev. Paul Gaffney,
ACPE Certified Educator Candidate, Shaw Chaplaincy Institute Program Manager


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